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Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium

Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium

What is CPIC?

The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®) is an international consortium of individual volunteers and a small dedicated staff who are interested in facilitating use of pharmacogenetic tests for patient care.

One barrier to implementation of pharmacogenetic testing in the clinic is the difficulty in translating genetic laboratory test results into actionable prescribing decisions for affected drugs.

CPIC’s goal is to address this barrier to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic tests by creating, curating, and posting freely available, peer-reviewed, evidence-based, updatable, and detailed gene/drug clinical practice guidelines (click here for all CPIC publications).  CPIC guidelines follow standardized formats, include systematic grading of evidence and clinical recommendations, use standardized terminology, are peer-reviewed, and are published in a leading journal (in partnership with Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics) with simultaneous posting to cpicpgx.org, where they are regularly updated.

CPIC started as a shared project between PharmGKB and the Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN) in 2009. CPIC guidelines are indexed in PubMed as clinical guidelines, endorsed by ASHP and ASCPT, and referenced in ClinGen and PharmGKB.

Additionally, the College of American Pathologists (CAP)  has stated: “CAP applauds and supports the objectives, processes and work completed as of December 2018 by the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®). These efforts will help clinicians, laboratories, health care providers and vendors.”

CPIC resources are freely available under a Creative Commons public domain license.
Read the license page for more details.

Team

CPIC Co-Principal Investigators
Kelly E. Caudle, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Teri E. Klein, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Co-Investigator
Mary V. Relling, Pharm.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

CPIC Informatics Co-Directors
Michelle Whirl-Carrillo, Ph.D.
Stanford University

James M. Hoffman, Pharm.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Stanford CPIC Coordinator
Michelle Whirl-Carrillo, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Steering Committee

Teri E. Klein, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Kelly E. Caudle, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Michelle Whirl-Carrillo, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Mary V. Relling, Pharm.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Dan M. Roden, M.D.
Vanderbilt University

Rachel F. Tyndale, Ph.D.
University of Toronto and CAMH

Larisa Cavallari, Pharm.D.
University of Florida

Stuart A. Scott, Ph.D.
Stanford University and Stanford Healthcare

Sara Van Driest, M.D., Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University

Scientific Advisory Board

Julie A. Johnson, Pharm.D.
University of Florida

Gwendolyn A. McMillin, Ph.D.
ARUP Laboratories

Robert Nussbaum, M.D.
University of California, San Francisco

Heidi Rehm, Ph.D.
Partners Healthcare

Marc S. Williams, M.D.
Geisinger

Sandy Aronson
Partners Personalized Medicine

Justin B. Starren, M.D., Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Houda Hachad, Pharm.D., M. Res.
AccessDx/Medtek21

Andrea Gaedigk, Ph.D.
Children’s Mercy

News & Announcements

  • The ClinGen Pharmacogenomics Working Group (PGxWG) has launched a survey to solicit feedback about the criteria and terminology that should be used to define clinical validity and actionability for pharmacogenes and variants. The ClinGen PGxWG is a multi-disciplinary team of researchers and professionals with expertise in pharmacogenomics (PGx), clinical pharmacology, medical genetics, regulatory affairs, and molecular diagnostics. It […]
  •  PharmVar announces several updates for CYP3A4 star allele definitions.Retirement of the CYP3A4*1G allele: this allele was defined by a common variant in intron 10 (c.1026+12G>A) which was also found on many other haplotypes (or star alleles). PharmVar transiently designated the CYP3A4*1G allele as *36 due to a possible role of c.1025+12G>A being involved in the regulation of CYP3A4 expression. However, owing to the growing body of inconsistent […]
  • CYP4F2 contributes to the synthesis of cholesterol, steroids and other lipids. It has been shown to regulate the bioavailability of vitamin E and vitamin K, a co-factor that is critical to blood clotting. Variations in this important pharmacogene can affect vitamin K levels and thus, the dosing of vitamin K antagonists such as the widely used anticoagulant drug warfarin […]
  • We are pleased to announce that PharmGKB is included in the first list of Global Core Biodata Resources (GCBRs), a collection of resources whose long term funding and sustainability is critical to life science and biomedical research worldwide.The Global Biodata Coalition (GBC) brings together major public and charitable funders, with the aim to “stabilize sustainable […]
  • Pablo Zubiaur & Andrea Gaedigk have an editorial online ahead of print in Pharmacogenomics calling for the inclusion of CYP2C18 in more studies of drug metabolism [PMID: 36331025].CYP2C18 is in a cluster on chromosome 10 that has CYP2C18, CYP2C19, CYP2C9 and CYP2C8 that spans 500k bases (NCBI gene browser). The authors comment that CYP2C18 is […]

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