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Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium

Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium

What is CPIC?

The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®) is an international consortium of individual volunteers and a small dedicated staff who are interested in facilitating use of pharmacogenetic tests for patient care.

One barrier to implementation of pharmacogenetic testing in the clinic is the difficulty in translating genetic laboratory test results into actionable prescribing decisions for affected drugs.

CPIC’s goal is to address this barrier to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic tests by creating, curating, and posting freely available, peer-reviewed, evidence-based, updatable, and detailed gene/drug clinical practice guidelines (click here for all CPIC publications).  CPIC guidelines follow standardized formats, include systematic grading of evidence and clinical recommendations, use standardized terminology, are peer-reviewed, and are published in a leading journal (in partnership with Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics) with simultaneous posting to cpicpgx.org, where they are regularly updated.

CPIC started as a shared project between PharmGKB and the Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN) in 2009. CPIC guidelines are indexed in PubMed as clinical guidelines, endorsed by ASHP and ASCPT, and referenced in ClinGen and PharmGKB.

Additionally, the College of American Pathologists (CAP)  has stated: “CAP applauds and supports the objectives, processes and work completed as of December 2018 by the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC®). These efforts will help clinicians, laboratories, health care providers and vendors.”

CPIC resources are freely available under a Creative Commons public domain license.
Read the license page for more details.

Team

CPIC Co-Principal Investigators
Kelly E. Caudle, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Teri E. Klein, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Co-Investigator
Mary V. Relling, Pharm.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

CPIC Informatics Co-Directors
Michelle Whirl-Carrillo, Ph.D.
Stanford University

James M. Hoffman, Pharm.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Stanford CPIC Coordinator
Michelle Whirl-Carrillo, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Steering Committee

Teri E. Klein, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Kelly E. Caudle, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Michelle Whirl-Carrillo, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Mary V. Relling, Pharm.D.
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Dan M. Roden, M.D.
Vanderbilt University

Rachel F. Tyndale, Ph.D.
University of Toronto and CAMH

Larisa Cavallari, Pharm.D.
University of Florida

Stuart A. Scott, Ph.D.
Stanford University and Stanford Healthcare

Sara Van Driest, M.D., Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University

Scientific Advisory Board

Julie A. Johnson, Pharm.D.
University of Florida

Gwendolyn A. McMillin, Ph.D.
ARUP Laboratories

Robert Nussbaum, M.D.
University of California, San Francisco

Heidi Rehm, Ph.D.
Partners Healthcare

Marc S. Williams, M.D.
Geisinger

Sandy Aronson
Partners Personalized Medicine

Justin B. Starren, M.D., Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Houda Hachad, Pharm.D., M. Res.
AccessDx/Medtek21

Andrea Gaedigk, Ph.D.
Children’s Mercy

News & Announcements

  • The PharmVar GeneFocus: SLCO1B1 paper has just been published by Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics. This review provides a general overview of SLCO1B1 as well as a deeper dive into its nomenclature. This GeneFocus covers genetic variability, functional impact, clinical relevance, gene nomenclature before and after PharmVar updates, methods for allele characterization and how the new nomenclature impacts pharmacogenetic testing and interpretation. Specific details of changes to allele definitions can be found […]
  • PharmVar and PharmGKB are excited to share that CYP2A6 has been transitioned into the PharmVar database. CYP2A6 metabolizes several substates including coumarin, nicotine, aflatoxin B1, nitrosamines, and some pharmaceuticals. Owing to its highly polymorphic nature, CYP2A6 activity varies considerably between individuals. Due to the complex nature of the CYP2A gene locus that contains not only CYP2A6, but also the highly similar CYP2A7 and CYP2A13 genes, CYP2A6 genotype […]
  • ClinGen is hosting a Clinical Genomics Career Panel webinar series this summer for individuals interested in career in clinical genomics. Sessions are moderated and panel members will discuss their work and career paths. All are welcome to join!
  • The PharmGKB Acyclovir/Ganciclovir Pathway has recently been published in the journal Pharmacogenetics and Genomics.Acyclovir (ACV) and ganciclovir (GCV) are commonly prescribed antivirals to treat infections caused by herpes viruses, varicella-zoster virus or cytomegalovirus (eg. cold sores, shingles and chicken pox, etc.). The pathway, co-developed by Maud Maillard along with other members of the Yang Lab in St. Jude, as well […]
  • Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) will introduce new educational initiatives on the risks of prescribing the chemotherapy drug capecitabine to patients with DPD deficiency as part of a lawsuit settlement.The settlement was reached with Joanne McIntyre, whose husband David died as a result of severe capecitabine toxicity. David carried variations in the gene DPYD, which […]

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